Thursday, July 9, 2009

All those many letters and symbols what do they mean


Click to enlarge and do print one for your use
For the most recent Lutterloh symbols chart see this post here.

9 comments:

  1. Is and pattern not having the knit symbol designed with the ease needed for making it with wovens? I am trying to make clothes for my overweight granddaughter; Can I get more questions regarding using the patterns. I find them hard to figure out except for the simple t-shirt type pattern, especially when they have a separate yoke. T

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  2. I wrote the last note and meant to say does any pattern not having the knit symbol make up as a woven garment with the ease needed to out it on.

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  3. I'm not certain what you might be asking but we have a whole set of posting on the knits patterns I suggest you read those and see if they give you something that will help with that granddaughter. If you look at the right of our web site there is a list of suggests we have already covered, read the "how to use knits to make woven patterns" Also read "fullness and ease" as that will help in making a pattern fit any one.

    good luck with your project

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  4. yes each pattern has the designers ease in it, it may not be your ease so check it to be sure

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  5. Hi! I don't know if you check this any more, but I have a question....I know that all the marks below the waist are with your hip measurement, and at the waist and above are the bust, but with vintage (1950's) Lutterloh I am confused, since the waist is never below the actual waistline - I measured the waist with my bust measurement. The early symbols page you have above seems to say that anything below the cross should be hip measurement and anything above - the bust. Is this right? (If so, I have to fix the pattern I just made!!)

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  6. Hi Andie, yes we're still checking. The cross symbol is only used to place your pin for the measuring scale and to mark a spot for length adjustments to your patterns. Although the cross may fall at the waistline on occasion you should still use your bust measurement for the waist and above dots and your hip measurement for the dots below the waist. The rules for the patterns have not changed even since the very first Lutterloh patterns. The symbols have evolved slightly over time just to make the patterns a little easier to understand. There is a whole separate post on the evolution of the symbols page here:
    http://sewingnhumming.blogspot.com/2010/01/lutterloh-system-symbols-page-evolution.html

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  7. Thanks, Ann! I think I was reading the evolution of symbols page..., on the 1950's page (2nd photo down)it says at point 5: " In the case of outsize figures...(etc)" I read this as every point above the cross should be bust and below should be hips...weird. OK then! My pattern will be right, hopefully...should the waistline of a skirt be done with bust measurement, then and below the waist as hip measurement??

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  8. Andie, I see what you mean now about point 5 on that page. It is a little confusing. I think this may be one of those times when the translation from German to English may have twisted things a little. At any rate, yes, for a skirt you would use the bust measurement for the waist and the hip measurement for anything below the waist. Remember to paper fit your pattern before cutting fabric and if you're still in doubt you can always do a few flat pattern measurements to be sure you have enough ease before cutting.

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  9. Thank you for the symbols list.

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