Monday, July 6, 2009

Making a pattern

I am making the PJ's on the right. I'm going for the pants and top
Taken from a 1989 pattern book

You can click on all the photo's to enlarge
I have listed over to the right some great places to view video showing you just how to make a Lutterloh pattern but here is a photo run through my P.j pattern.
(Finished P.j photos pending. :-)


First I take a peek at the picture of the outfit. What does it tell me? I see a ruffled collar, button's down the front. Looks like the front shoulder is dropped and the dart has been moved to the shoulder for some slight gathering. That's nice. Looks like a pattern for neck facing in the back You can't see that in the picture. I will also need to look at the pattern to really see what is going on with the pants. It's good to be able to check back to the pattern picture so I can think through how this will sew together. I scan both pattern and picture from my Lutterloh book and print so I can write on it and use it fully.



Now I look at the pattern. The pants look loose and they have an elastic waist that will sew up quickly! The top is marked for a facing, see the hatch marks? The PJ top back has a neck dart, that will keep it fitted nicely. The sleeve is straight cut so it will be comfortable. These are real laze around clothes I see. There are but very few pieces so I will have these made in no time. I should remember to trace over the facing while the patterns are still taped to my table.......

Here we go...........



I bought a wide fold up table perfect for any pattern and puts away easily. This is in my kitchen where I have lots of light!


Some of my tools include some foam for the tack (it is smaller than any I have been able to buy so I don't want to loose it) I have a couple of pieces of scrap wood. One to tape under the pattern cross and one in case I loose the first.



I have a collection of Lutterloh tape measures. Some are very old

The best ones have the marking hole clearly marked by the number. The old ones are a bit of a puzzle and if you have one let me know and I'll tell you more. The red and black numbers are only for making it easier to read and it does!



I use colored fine tip markers for making the dots and a pencil for outlining the pattern. I often make changes in the outside line for my body shape adjustments and pencil is best. I keep all the small stuff in this zippered pouch it is very handy!




You may have gotten a cardboard tailors curve with your kit.

You can buy plastic ones from Lutterloh and other locations. These can be very handy

OR you don't need anything but a good ruler. I'll show you how.





I use a light weight white pattern paper for making my patterns on. This lets me hold the pattern up and test if it is a good fit. Paper testing.




1st. once you have studied your pattern. Tape the little piece of wood to the center of your table. This protects your table from pin holes and holds the pin firmly while you pivot for marking the pattern parts.




2nd Pre-hole your pattern cross.

I scan my pattern to the exact size (I hold the scan and the real pattern up to a window and compare the outside lines) I never poke holes in my real patterns.

By putting a hole in the pattern before putting on the tape you will not end up missing the middle of the cross.




One of these tapes is old and it does not have arrows pointing to the hole for the numbers. This causes mistakes and I don't use this one.

The newer one on the left has little arrows pointing to the numbers so no worries with this one. If you have one without arrows go to the top number (140) see that the hole for 140 rests under the number, at the end of the line.

This means that every number will have it's hole below the number.

Watch carefully if using a tape like the one on the right.



Before I tape things down I like to test and see if the largest number on the pattern will fit where my papers goes. I stretch out the tape and test. If it doesn't I take the tack out and move that paper a bit. It isn't a big deal if I run out of space I just add some paper with some clear tape.


For the marks above the waist I use my bust measurement #128 . My measurement was 127 but these are Pj's so I went up to #128. I am careful to mark these numbers on my pattern in case I do make choices different than the norm.



See where the little block is under my paper and pattern

I push the tack into the wood and save my table!




I go to my first number #32 and I line up my tape with the line next to the number.
Then I smooth my tape down as I stay at the angle of the line until I get to #32 and I put a dot


The dark line under each number is the correct place to mark your dot






Here I am at 32.5 go to the dark line at 32 and move to the light line that is a 1/2 or .5




Now I am ready to make the two dots that are below my waist. I move the tack into my hip measurement and then I pull the tape to the last two marks and put my dots.



I leave the tack and tape in the pattern while I draw the outline. It helps if I can't figure out a dot I can recheck....just remember if you are above your hip or below you will need to change what number your tack is in. Most of my mistakes are above the waist so when doing my pattern I start below the waist for hip marks and then change to my bust measurements so that is what is sitting there as I draw the outline.



mark all the straight lines first, the bottoms the sides the shoulders then I move to the curves


I am using my tailors curve to make the armscye
Lutterloh suggests you always hit 3 dots that way you have the curve in the correct angle






As you can see one dot doesn't work out. Not a problem make that curve nicely
and it will all be fine.




The curve above I did by hand, no tools, just move from dot to dot with a swirl of the pencil. It's fun, do it several times trying to make it as good as possible. In the next step you will see that I darkened the path that looked best and that is where I will cut my pattern






Time to put in all the pattern markings normally I would make my pattern adjustments at this point but I'd like to cut these out first so you can see them. In another post I will show you how I shorten the length of the top and adjust the armscye and fix the pants for length


I add all the markings for the pattern, this is the gathered shoulder
And the neck, button band facing is marked and I can just trace a pattern off of this




As you can see I ran out of paper on the sleeve it was easy to grab a scrap and tape it there for the next dot.



If you look at the pattern the sleeve curves from the under arm scye. Not a lot and it straightens out quickly and goes down to the wrist. This takes pratice to get an eye for these little things that make fit much better.



Here it is all the pieces for the top
front, back, neck facing, ruffled collar, sleeve
They do not have seam allowances or hems on them. I prefer to add seams etc. when I lay the pattern on the fabric. It leaves the patterns free of allowances I'd have to cut out if I were changing things in the pattern.


Ann's note: I have been taking the copies of my patterns one step further by cutting them apart into the separate pieces such as front, back, sleeve, etc. This way when I tape each piece to the pattern paper I can leave it taped there in case there is a question of accuracy later. The miniature pattern is in exactly the same spot as when I drew the pattern and I can easily check my dot placement.

97 comments:

  1. Pam from South AustraliaJuly 12, 2009 at 6:32 PM

    Great hint Ann. Thankyou. Such a simple idea but didn't think of it. I invariably have to replace the pattern to check on dot accuracy.

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  2. Pam from South AustraliaJuly 19, 2009 at 8:59 PM

    Another question. Would it make any difference to the accuracy of the drafting if you enlarge the copy of the 'little' pattern before you start?

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  3. YES! it does make a difference. I posted a whole article on this before we had to go off. I will try to find it and restore it. But trust me that it doesn't change things in a good way. I made three different size enlargements and the biggest problems occur in the neck, shoulders, armscye and in the lower hem area. Do your very best to print then lay the printed copy over your pattern. If it is just a whisper over you'd be ok. I know I never put tacks in my orginal patterns I only use scans. Good luck

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  4. Pam from South AustraliaJuly 20, 2009 at 12:20 AM

    Mmm. Interesting. I have only ever scanned to original size, but I haven't checked to make sure this happens. I have an ease problem, the recent blouse pattern I did came out exactly my size, no ease at all. I have noticed on PR that Lutterloh users generally claim the ease is too generous for their likes, so I was puzzled. I wonder if my scanned copy is a bit smaller than the original? Will have to check that!

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  5. Pam,
    Fashion plays with ease and every generation it is different. It comes and goes. What year was the pattern you were making from? Also to help you along, don't hold the tape measure tight as you take you measurements, just let the tape rest comfortably as if a light garment. Please check back mid week for photos and hints on what to do about ease.

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  6. When the pants pattern shows there is a facing with the hatch marks showing. Do you cut another piece of fabric to face? or do you turn the facing part down?

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  7. Hi Betty,
    The hatch marks you mention may be indicating a casing for elastic. If a separate sew on facing is required the piece will be marked with an "ST" which is the symbol for a sewn on facing.A fold down facing will be marked with a dashed line indicating a fold line.You can consult the symbols page here:

    http://sewingnhumming.blogspot.com/2009/07/all-those-many-letters-and-symbols-what.html

    to be sure.

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  8. im very new to lutterloh...i bought this system last year but got discouraged. Heres a dumb question...is the ease suppose to be in the patterns already or do you need to add it?

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  9. I'm sure many new to Lutterloh wonder this same thing. The ease is supposed to be included in the pattern already. It's always a good idea to paper fit your pattern to be sure it has your desired amount of ease though. Everyone has their own preference for ease it seems. The only thing you need to be sure to add is seam and hem allowances.

    What was it exactly that discouraged you?

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  10. Hi, there...Could you tell me if there are supposed to be notches on the sleeve pattern? If not, how do you tell the difference between the front and back? Thanks.

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  11. The lutterloh sleeves are designed with well fitted forms. You can easily see the front from the back. But if you are in question go to #3 The symbol chart in our links on the top right. The chart will tell you the symbols used to denote front and back. Notches are added at your choosing and sleeves can surely use them. A back sleeve is usually longer by 1/2" or so. find the center and notch that on both the sleeve and armsyce. Any time you draft a pattern that is to be cut into two (princess lines etc) be sure and draw a ruler line across the two pieces in several places and notch the fabric so they fit back together perfectly.

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  12. Thank you for the information regarding the sleeves. I completed missed the symbol "V", too.

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  13. what is Muslin and how do i make it?

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  14. Muslin is an expensive fabric mostly light weight and loose weave. It is a cream color and often used to test patterns. Use any fabric but your fashion fabric to test your patterns and always paper test to save tons of work.

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  15. my son wants a pair of 1920's oxford bags
    is it possible to buy this pattern?

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  16. The old patterns are only available 2nd hand. You would need to know what book the pattern was in and buy that book on e-bay etc. If it is a current pattern say in the last 5 of 6 years you can order suppliments and books from one of the Lutterloh sites on the right hand bar. we are not part of Lutterloh but are here with their okay. We only teach how to use the patterns. Hope you find what you need. I'm not sure what and oxford bag is I'll have to look that one up! hehe

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  17. I love it, i´ve many clothes with this method.

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  18. I just watched a DVD called Pattern Fitting Seminar. Home Sewing Made Easy (Slacks). 20003? There website is www.designtofit.com. It was a two hr Lutterloh class followed by a class demonstrating drafting and sewing a pair of pants the Lutterloh way. The whole video had tuns of info to help you use the system effectively. He talked a lot about the need for a walking foot and roller foot and how to use them. He talked about the 7 seams that need the feed dogs under them eg back side seams, sleave cap sand collars. He demonstrated how you could tage a sleeve from one pattern and use it on another, or collar, or bodice etc as a way of designing exactly

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  19. what you want. The slacks seamstress used the hip measurement to draft the waistline and then went back and checked it. I thought I should use the waist measurement to draw the waistline. I made some slacks today that do fit but I know I can do better. I had made 2 muslims already this week using different systems. Also, I feel lost without notches and other markings. Is there a way to match any of the dots of one piece that would correspond to the other side? No notches to line up pocket, pocket facing to pants etc made me crazy!

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  20. Dear Lastleap,

    You can put your own markings on any pattern. Lay a front and back together and just pencil across a mark, now they will match when you sew. we usually put these in places where one pattern piece has ease and the other one doesn't, we put them on the sleeve and armscye so we get the ease evenly across the arm. I always take my paper patterns and match them up, I walk the sleeve pattern into the armscye. Anything that doesn't match I add or subtract paper to make a good matching pattern

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  21. Pants,

    Lastleap,

    Pants can be tricky but it's usually little things that make them fit better, can you tell me what is happening with your pants, or a photo is even better. I have finally mastered pants and think I can help. It's amazing that anyone can make good pants from a pattern we are shaped so interestingly different in the pant area.

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  22. I do have the pattern fitting video if it is the one that looks to have been done in the early 1980's. And YES people knew how to sew back then and they do not know the normal methods we once knew. If it helped you out that's wonderful. I suggest a good sewing book for everyone to reference to. There are lots of reviews on the many sewing books but I put my favorite one on this blog.

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  23. Thank you so much for responding! Yesterday I made #182 (MMVI Reg 026208). My two problems were the pockets (my fault) and the crotch length. Despite measuring per the video instructions, I did better to copy the front and back crotch length from a pair of old pants that I took apart that fit. My measurements were too long. I got them to fit but felt they were ho-hum.
    So today, I began again with a contoured waistband #161. Had to alter the crotch length again. Am worried about the pants length now. I expected the front and back lengths to be uneven, but only about 1/2 inch off, so we'll see. They are all cut out now in muslim because I have no more "cheap fabric" to practice with. Plan to sew them up tomorrow. Will try to send photo.
    I have plenty of books and videos to help me with construction and I ordered Pattern Making By the Flat-Pattern Method by Norma R Hollen. You are absolutely right about needing to think your way through the construction. "Back in the day", LOL, I was a perfect size 8 in Vogue patterns and just sewed them up one after the other. Never had to alter a thing! Am completely self-taught so never really learned the basics of how things go together.
    Am determined to master this because I have an unbelievable stash collected over many years of wools and silks that need to be sewn. I am retired now and have the time.
    Thanks soo much for your help!

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  24. LastLeap,

    Before you go any further on the pants issue, materials costing money and such, e-mail me and I'll give you some extra ideas.

    North7r@frontier.com

    I learned from Normas book, it's one of my favorites!

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  25. Thank you for your detailed, set by step guide.
    I measured out a pair of shorts this morning using the hip measurement. The waist is far too narrow. Perhaps I should have changed to the waist measurements rather than continue with the hip measurements for the waistline?
    I'm a new user of Lutterloh, as you can tell. Help, please! Thanks.

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  26. With pants there are so many areas that have to fit. If all that isn't working is the waist just take a pencil and mark your waist measurment on the paper and enlarge from the hip out to the waist. Add 1 1/2 inches of ease to your waist and if you want darts add that in. Two in the front, one on each side and 4 in the back. These can be smaller or what ever will draw in the waist. You should always have your pants waist a little larger than your waist band. so make your waist band your waist measurement plus any over lap for a button or snap. Have I lost you? If the pattern isn't fitting in more than the waist just remeasure. You are not doing a tight tape measure when you do. Let it rest on your body at about the ease you would like. Your finger could fit beneath to hold the tape that is what I usually do.

    Does this help you? pants are the hardest for everyone to fit. I hope you made your vest first it is the best way to get a sloper for all the patterns. We have several posting about this. Welcome to a fun way to make patterns.!

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  27. Thank you for responding.
    I have not made a sloper; the shorts being my first Lutterloh pattern endeavour! Thank you for the suggestion to make a vest sloper pattern as a start. I'll do so. I see there is trouser making class offered via CD/Internet. (http://www.dressmaking.co.nz/online_projects.htm). Have you perhaps reviewed the class and if so, do you think it would be suitable as an introductory project for a newbie? Or should one have more Lutterloh pattern experience before signing up for a class such as this? How I wish there were classes here (Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA)! Thanks

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  28. The reason you make the Vest first is that you end up with a garment that tells you how all the tops will fit and because the vest comes down to your hip you also cover how the top of both pants and skirts will fit. Once you know what adjustments you need you will do that in ever pattern. I always need a narrower shoulder and a shorter top.

    I highly recommend the classes from NZ Lutterloh. I know she is now sending out Cd's of the classes but in the classes I took there was tons of support from an experienced Lutterloh sewer. So go for it and enjoy the learning experience. And do look at some the the things we have been making from the patterns it will inspire you to find your body issues and sew sew sew

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  29. I wonder if anyone could tell me where to get a copy of the vest pattern from? I'm in the UK and just bought the Lutterloh system, but the vest isn't included. I'd like to make it as a trial, as you recommend. I see the photo of the pattern on this blog, but if I printed it, would it be the right size to use?

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  30. Hi Jane,
    I wouldn't try to print the vest pattern from the blog, it's not likely to print the correct size. If you look at the links on our sidebar to the right you'll see a section titled, "Lutterloh web sites you should check out". Under this heading there's a link to a Lutterloh site in New Zealand. If you join their mailing list they will send you three Lutterloh patterns, including the vest. The newsletters have some very useful information so are well worth it.

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  31. I am surprised they didn't give you the vest pattern. I'm curious how they told you to fit the patterns? Was it using the vest? Usually the vest pattern is in a folded pamphlet. But follow Ann's directions and you should have one to print out.

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  32. Thank you both for the information, I'll subscribe to the NZ site and hopefully get it that way. My pack with the pattern system came directly from Germany, it didn't have a brochure or any fitting information either, so finding this website has been so useful!

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  33. Hello Suzanne here, not sure if my post went through, will try again so please bear with me.

    Ladies you do a very good job of keeping me informed on Lutterloh topics and pattern construction.
    I have never heard of anyone using the Lutterloh system where I live except me, so I appreciate this website very much.

    I did not receive the vest pattern either but wrote away and got it. My vest turned out wonderful! I am so pleased, now onto something that I can challenge myself with.

    I have had the good fortune to purchase Lutterloh patterns from the 60's and what's not to like about that era? The Jackie "O" of fashion gowns...etc. So this leads to my question.

    - Can the Lutterloh pattern pieces of the sixties interchange with Lutterloh patterns of today?

    Don't really see why they wouldn't - to me it should be a matter of understanding the pattern and how it goes together. Am I right?

    I believe I read somewhere they differed somehow but don't remember where I read this. Please let me know your comments on this. Thanks ladies!

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  34. Welcome Suzanne,

    most times when we interchange a pattern piece it is sleeves or collars. It is so easy to draw a pattern up you can do some from the two different books and then "Walk" the pieces into the armscye or neck of the pattern you'd like to use.

    If they are off then all you do is add or remove some of each pattern piece. Let's say my sleeve is too small for the armscye so add some to your sleeve, walk it again see if it fits and now you have a new pattern. If you are wanting to "Update" and old 60's pattern for todays comfort you will need to drop the underarm and widen the sleeve, change any collars to reflect the size of todays' style. If you only change the depth of a collar it will still fit nicely in the neck of the pattern.

    We do discuss this a bit in and our of our postings so hopefully you will find more here on this.

    Wishing you lots of sewing success

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  35. Hi Fonnell,
    I love your blog! a lot of useful information and tips, I am distributor in Canada, Could you add my site in your Lutterloh's sites links?
    www.lutterloh.ca , here my email also: ecruz@lutterloh.ca for any question if I can help, I'm spanish, french and english speaker.
    Warm regards to everyone and happy sewing!

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  36. I tried the lutterloh system a couple times to make dresses and always came out way too big. I have double checked every measurement. Read instructions over and over. I am not confused about how to use it. Bust measurement for everything above waist, etc. I ended up with way too many alterations, took way too much time. Any advice?

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  37. May I ask if you are large busted? If so making your patterns for your bust size will make them too large. It would be better to make your pattern by the chest measurement (above your bust) and then to a large bust adjustment.

    I also wonder if you made your test vest? Did this pattern work out for you?

    You can read more about this kind of adjustment and others by clicking our posting on the side bar. We discuss the large bust adjustment and other problems the patterns can give you.

    Let me know if you need other help?

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  38. Thanx for the quick response. I did not make test vest. I thought I could jump right into it. No not big bust just a B cup.I should probably try to make test vest first.If test vest comes out too big should I try chest measurement or maybe under bust measurement, lol.Thanx again.

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  39. After you make and adjust the vest if you haven't learned what is causing the poor fit then go down one size and try that, make another vest (these are quick mock-ups) then go down another size. And please read my last posting about tracing your shoulders, it could be you have extra fabric just at the top which is a result of an incorrect shoulder shape. Which is so easy to fix, so very easy!

    Explore and soon you will be able to sew any of the patterns and know what you need to adjust.

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  40. Thankyou, I saw the shoulder post and it is an awesome idea. I will definitely try it. I know for sure that is one problem.

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  41. Hi--This is wonderful information. Thanks so much for taking the time to post it all. I made the vest pattern and am making a muslin from that now. Question: When I make a garment with sleeves, should I try to mark notches on the pattern to match sleeves to the bodice, and if so, how do I place those notches properly? Also, when making the vest pattern, I had one dot at the armscye that was way out of line from the others. I checked the measurements several times, but they always checked out. Does this sometimes happen, or did I goof up?
    Ann D

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  42. Oops, it looks like one of the Sept 19th, 2010 comments answered my markings question.
    Ann D

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  43. In an armscye and a sleeve the notches are put in to correspond to the turning of the french curve. Also a double notch goes in the back and a single goes in the front.

    However the reality is that once you put the underarm seams together on the armsyce and the sleeve that rest of that sleeve needs to be set in to fit your own body. What this means is that once the sleeve is sitting in correctly then you can make matching marks on about 1/3 the way up from the under arm of both pieces and it will make it easier to match the sleeve next time you make it.

    It's odd to me to put a sleeve in by a patterns notches when my arm doesn't even lean or move that way, so safety pin the under arms and then carefully ease the sleeve making sure it is hanging correctly with the grain line hanging straight. Hope you can understand a bit of this, it can seem very complex.

    It isn't the patterns notches that gets your sleeve in correctly, it's you.

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  44. Thank you. I am learning, slowly, to think outside the box and analyze the fit at every stage, rather than blindly following a pattern and trusting that it will come out alright in the end. The more I learn about the hows and whys of things the more I am enjoying it. Thanks again for all the information you have made available here. Ann

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  45. I just got my Lutterloh kit yesterday and tried to make a pattern. For the dart measurement, I need to go under the center pattern to place the dot. How is this done?

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  46. As a dart it will be changed to fit your body, but I just put a stick pin through and mark it when I pull things off. Have you made the fitting vest first? If not the Lutterloh NZ links on the side offer a free pattern for the fitting vest. Once the vest is well fit you can take those same adjustments and do them on all your Lutterloh patterns.

    Good luck and enjoy all those wonderful patterns. And check out of ideas for making each pattern work for lots of good styles.

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  47. If you go to this website:

    http://www.lutterlohsystem.com/Instruction%20Video.html

    you can view a video on how the basic vest pattern is drawn including the darts. You'll see that even Mr. Lutterloh suggests adjusting your dart once the pattern is marked to be sure it fits your unique shape.

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  48. I can't find a working link for the large bust adjustment - referenced web site seems to be for sale? Is there anywhere else I can find it?
    Paula
    PS can't figure out how to put my name on this ?blog? I guess it is? - hope "anonymous" is ok.

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  49. I'm sorry you couldn't find the large bust adjustment. It is very helpful. links come and go...Here are a couple that are ok for large bust adjustment.

    There was a large bust adjustment in the Threads magazine. Don't use that is it missing some really important steps.

    The Palmer/Pletsch book Fit for Real People is really great with lots of large bust helps.

    http://pinkchalkstudio.com/blog/2009/01/19/enlightenment-the-full-bust-adjustment/

    With adding a dart ....

    http://sew-la-fabric.blogspot.com/2010/04/full-bust-adjustment-aka-fba.html

    With a dart already in place

    http://sew-la-fabric.blogspot.com/2010/04/adding-to-existing-dart.html

    My favorite web site for this is now gone... boo whoo

    As for your name I think you need a google account perhaps. We don't mind if you sign your notes

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for your help. I am studying the web sites, and will find a copy of Fit for Real People.

      Hancock Fabrics in my area (Rock hill SC, Huntersville NC,Johnson City & Kingsport TN) is having the pattern design class and opportunity to buy the system and tools. I just wanted to make sure I would be able to use them.

      Do the Full Figure Supplements work with the regular system, or the XXL? I want to be sure I have the right tape.

      Thanks so much!

      Paula

      Delete
    2. I see we didn't answer you so if you haven't solved this problem already. The full figure patterns work with the normal tape but the XXL has it's own patterns and will only work with it's own tape...Blue in color

      Delete
  50. Hi! I'm new here and just started working with Lutterloh patterns. I wonder how to make a pattern for me, cause it looks different than in picture. The problem is, that the lowest drawing point comes over the center line. Is this OK? Maybe the reason is my body type, the pear with big hip.

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  51. welcome. We'd need to know a lot more to be able to help you. Can you describe the pattern? If you know the year that would also make it possible for us to check the pattern. When you say lowest drawing point you are on the bottom of a dress, skirt, top? and it crosses over? Well tell me more.

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  52. It's a tunic/top from the year 2006 (MMVI) and the number is 266. And thank you so much of your quick reply!

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  53. As I only have the 2006 suppliments I'm going to check to see if I have the right pattern. Is it a v neck, Sleeves nearly to the arm bend Semi-bell loose sleeve? My page has three tops on it. It's very casual and loose? Not tell me exactly where the problems are? You used the bust number for any dot above the waist and with this top so loose you must use the hips measurement in your tape for the last few dots on the top. Is there where it has pulled in? Maybe you used the bust numbers by mistake? You can take a photo and send me a j-peg of your pattern?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi again!
      Since the upper and lower part are of very different sizes, the center front does not remain in a straight line. Should use the bust measurement for making the hem also?

      Delete
  54. Try trusting the system. make the pattern with bust measurement at top, hip measurement at bottom. Cut out the paper and paper fit to see if it's even close.

    Next thought, are you large busted and narrow hipped? It might look odd but it should fit. It's really easy to taper in a side seam if it doesn't seem right once you paper fit.

    Next thought. Did you make the ever important fitting Vest? If so any changes you made in the fitting Vest will be made in every pattern.

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    Replies
    1. Yes, I made the upper part with bust measurement and the lower part with the hip one.

      No, I have a pear body type - narrow sholders and not large busted + full hip.
      And I used the actual size for a smaller, because always the patterns are too large for my sholders. The hip measurement is actual size.

      I haven't maken the vest yet.

      Delete
  55. check the main blog and see if that is your pattern.

    If your shoulders are smaller, you can use smaller numbers just in the shoulders and normal numbers for bust and hips. Ann wrote a post on this if you can locate it.

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    Replies
    1. Yes, it's the same pattern. May I copy the picture and show you how does my ready pattern piece look like?

      Delete
  56. you can make a comment with your e-mail address on it....I won't post it
    and we can carry this on by e-mail

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry I don't find your e-mail address where to send it.

      Delete
  57. You must send your e-mail in a posting....I will e-mail you and not post your e-mail

    ReplyDelete
  58. Hi, i am interested in trying the Lutterloh system and i was wondering what the differences are in a vintage edition of the book and a new one? Has the system changed over the years? Or, will the patterns in the book just be new? I enjoy making vintage inspired clothing, so i would like the older patterns. Also, is it possible to develop original designs and then make the pattern using the book? Many thanks!

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  59. Hi Anonymous,
    The only difference with the vintage is the way clothes fit was different. Sleeve were
    snug and armholes up higher under your arm. The other big differences were determined by the style, as big 1950's skirts, very straight 1940's skirts etc. Enjoy

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  60. Hi,
    I purchased the Lutterloh system and I have made the vest twice. I did the bust and hip measurements, but the completed product always is too small. I do not know it is it fabric, if I am measuring wrong, or if I am just not using the system right, but it is very frustrating.

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  61. So Anonymous please tell me what wasn't fitting? Too tight...Put the tape measure over the high part of your back where it is widest. There should be a drawing in the beginning of your book that shows how...If the lengths are wrong you can adjust those the system is usually very good on circumference but you need to adjust for lengths. Easy to do. If it's too small in the hips we adjust for that or too small in the bust we do a large bust adjustment. I'm hoping you find more help as you read our past postings.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi,
      I did follow the pamphet directions and added the seam allowance. I cut out another vest this (sadly)is 130 and my hip is 122.I tried using 124/122, which were my original chest/hip measurements with my first vest and it was too small. I do not like tight clothes so I went up to 126/124 and that did not work. The one I cut out this morning is 128/130. I pinned it to me and it seemed to cover everything, but once I sew it, it still my be snug.

      Delete
  62. Anonymous, you are remembering to add seam allowances, right?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Ann,
      I did add the seam allowance. I do not like tight clothes. It could also be that I am using fabric that does not give. It is 100% cotton fabric.

      Delete
  63. The cotton wouldn't make a difference...We really need to sort out your size you are making this at....
    1. are you large busted? Take the pattern that fit the best and make a large bust adjustment in it...The internet has tons of locations to see how this is done...It is easy.
    I think this might just solve your problem.

    Next if you don't like tight clothes..you can add some at the sides of your vest and see if that will solve your problem.

    Ann an I love that you are working out your problems on the Vest. It makes a world of difference when you start into the patten book.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi.
      I cut the vest out at 128 chest and 130 for hip, but I have not sewn it yet. I wear a D cup but I am also larger (you probrably guessed it from the chest size. I have looked at several large bust adjustment videos. I hope I can do that. I will post another note after I put the vest together. I taught myself how to sew using sewing books. That might be why I am not getting something that I should be getting.

      Delete
  64. http://www.pinkchalkstudio.com/blog/2009/01/19/enlightenment-the-full-bust-adjustment/

    Here is one large bust adjustment blog...The photos really do show it clearly but the step by step isn't that good.

    http://threedresses.wordpress.com/2012/01/25/full-bust-adjustment-tutorial-shift-dress/

    This site has the step by step nicely stated but it is on a dress so hope that doesn't make it hard to visualize.

    ReplyDelete
  65. Hi again Pierce,
    If we had an idea of exactly where your vest is too tight we may be better able to pinpoint the problem. Is the vest too tight all the way down, just at the bust, or perhaps only across the back in certain areas? Have you looked at the instruction video on the Lutterloh site here:

    http://www.lutterlohsystem.com/

    I wonder if you might be pulling the tape too tight or perhaps are not measuring high enough across your shoulder blades in back. Pay close attention, in the 15 minute video, how Frank Lutterloh finds the bust measurement of his model.
    One other consideration might be, is your pin moving from the center point of the pattern when you are measuring to mark your dots for the pattern? Sometimes, when the material you are pinning into is not sturdy enough, the pin can lean over when you pull the tape taut to mark your dots. This can affect the size of your pattern when you go to connect all the dots at the end.

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  66. Also Pierce,
    It will save you a lot of fabric to keep making paper patterns and paper fit. Match the fronts and the sides and see where you are not matching. A little tape on you and your clothes will hold that paper pattern in place. And Yes Ann I was thinking "is this the back too tight or the front" If you have already put the seam allowances on you can overlap them, if not match the sides exactly.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi again,
      I apologize in advance for the multiple questions. I want to learn this system becuase I love the patterns and I also want to make my own clothes.
      I rewatched the video and I am measuring the Frank measures in the video. It does not feel or look too tight in the back. When I cut out the paper patttern, I do not have an overlap. I remeasured myself again this morning and had the same measurements as I did last night. I am not sure if I put these here, but here they are. fullest part of chest 125 (high bust is 113, Hip = 123. I see the difference between HB and FB is 12cm. Should I cut out the paper pattern with the above measurements and then add 6cm to each of the front vest pieces for a total of 12cm by adding a large bust adjustment?

      Delete
  67. One more idea It is so helpful to get photos. A group of photos around front, side and back will tell you so much! It opens up the hidden problems that solve what you can see.

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  68. Yes make the large bust adjustment...It also adds length that often helps loosen up the side seams. When you don't do the large bust adjustment the fabric will pull to cover our round areas. That puts tension on all the other seams. You may...I'm crossing my fingers find that with that simple adjustment you will have the whole pattern fitting better. It is usually little changes that make it all work.

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  69. Okay, I did the paper pattern for Chest 114 and hip 124. I also managed to do the full bust adjustment. It did give me more room in the front, but the back piece was too small and I did not have much room under my arm. With the FBA, I had about 2cm too much. Since my chest measured 125, should I try the pattern again using 126 chest/124 hip and do a full bust adjustment after paper fitting it to me?

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  70. I cut out another paper pattern using 126/124 with a FBA only adding 4cm. It looked better on me. I cut it out and pinned it together. I will sew it tomorrow. The top front area overlapped a little, but I will see what it looks like when I put it together. I do like that I am looking at each step with more attention than I did with store bought patterns. I want to sew another pattern in the patternbook and make it come out looking like it does in the book. I have struggled with that from the store bought ones and I want to break the pattern.

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  71. Congratulations on all your have gained! I admire your sticking with this. Yes looking at each step is a great help and will continue to be.

    So now in paper fitting you can help yourself by putting a grain line on the paper. On the front take and make a long line 4-6" parallel to the front line.
    On the back same thing 4-6" parallel to the center back. When you tape the pieces and line them up with your body you will see if any of the pattern is not lining up with grain. If not we will correct it. It makes all the difference in how your clothing will hang. If we do it now in the paper we have much less to do in the fabric.

    Working on this vest is the future of all the patterns. Once it all fits you will know what you must do with every pattern and you won't be guessing as you make them.

    Me I make a large bust adjustment with every pattern, adjust my shoulder (mine slants a lot) and I shorten the length from waist to hips...I've barely 4" between. On every pattern I do this and then all I have to do is decide if I like the style on me! No guess work. on my pants and skirts I always make several little darts in the back so as not to make my rear side look odd. It's that high hips issue again.

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  72. Thank you so much for your help. I see that the pattern has a grain line, but I did not know I was supposed to measure that in. I do not think I will have trouble with the back, but I am not sure how to make it parallel on the front pieces. Once I do draw them in, do I measure the distance from the top of the grain line to the edge of the fabric and make sure it is the same distance away at the bottom of the grain line to the edge of the fabric?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes take the straight line of the middle front (the vest) and draw it from the shoulder to the hem...This will let you see if it is bending where it shouldn't. it's for a visual marker to where this pattern should be...If it's not then we adjust the slant on the shoulder first and work our way down
      until those grain lines are straight again. Amazing how it works

      Delete
  73. Hi. I would love to draft patterns that fit me and wondering if this system would be a good investment and if so, what will a basic kit cost in Singapore Dollars.

    ReplyDelete
  74. Hi Guys, First I would like to express how happy I am that I found this site. I have browsed through and found excellent tips and suggestions in using the Lutterloh system. I have purchased my Lutterloh kit several years ago. My question is: where can I get another measuring tape like the one that came with my kit?

    Thanks,
    Cheryl G. (email: Lsacmg@verizon,net)

    ReplyDelete
  75. order a tape measure from the Lutterloh site closest to you. We have several listed on the right side bar.

    ReplyDelete
  76. Hi there. Have you been able to figure out how lutterloh determines the placement of their starting points on their patterns..the "x" so to say? It seems if I can figure this out and then determine if there is a slightly better placement of the "x", my patterns will "fit" better..any ideas would be great..and thank you for your time:)

    ReplyDelete
  77. HI Anonymous,
    I haven't tried to figure out how the starting point is determined in the Lutterloh patterns. I only need a couple of alterations to the patterns to make them work for me. I'm not so sure moving the point for the pin placement would help. I haven't really found any substitute for learning and applying some flat pattern adjustments even to Lutterloh patterns. I discovered the ones that work for me from favorite sewing and fitting books. There is a post that mentions these in our archives.

    ReplyDelete
  78. Welcome Anonymous,

    The key note of Lutterloh patterns is how easy they are to work with. Just follow the hints for making the adjustments and there is no need to adjust points on the pattern. It can be a lot of fun once you make your fitting vest and start on outfits you like.

    ReplyDelete
  79. Hi

    I am having my first go at this using vintage books (1954 and 1957) - at first I found that the angles of the extension lines were wrong, but have realised that I was putting teh tack through the dot next to the number rather than the hole mark (I just have a copy of the tape measure). Just thought I'd mention this in case anyone else has the same problem. My book is German, and I am fine with this as I am quite an experienced sewer but I am still having one problem with the pattern drafting which I would like to sort out before proceeding further - its the darts. I dont understand how it works - the lines are at the wrong angles and I cant work out where the 'pointed' end should be. I have seen that the more recent patterns have a line floating outsid ethe pattern piece and you reverse that back to find your point, but these old ones dont appear to have that. I've just watched the lutterhol video and he used a dot like that but left the dart to be completed upon fitting? I have tried to extend the lines using the cross (angle is wrong) but it doesnt look even vaguely correct compared to the picture. Any thoughts please?

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  80. Hi lillibet,
    In the vintage books the darts drawn on the patterns are merely a suggestion as to placement. The lines are not intended to be used for any actual placement. For these darts you will need to paper fit the pattern by holding it up to your body and mark the bust point. I then use the pattern drawing as a rough guide to mark points at the edges of the pattern. This will determine the angle of the dart so pay close attention to the drawing. Keep in mind also that darts should never reach all the way to your actual bust point. The dart needs to end at least 1 inch shy of your bust point and up to 2 1/2 inches for a much larger bust. The larger the bust the further from the bust point the dart should end. For my D cup bust I usually end the dart from 1 1/2 - 2 inches from the bust point. Then you simply fold out the dart and recheck the paper fit. I usually baste my darts in if I'm not sure with the vintage patterns. That way you can always take out the basting and adjust the dart for a better fit.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you so much for this, especially for the distance from bust point as I didn't know this. Glad I wasn't just missing the something. I did notice that this was the approach the guy on the Lutterloh video seemed to take with modern ones - I think he had the end point marked but then cut to it and fitted the depth of the dart on the model. Glad I have a dummy to practice on.

      Delete
  81. This is so amazing. I have a collection of patterns from my years of tailoring. I would be thrilled to do the reverse, making my large draped or drafted patterns into the tiny pattern of the Lutterhol system. Do you know how they come up with the original tiny patterns for the Lutterhol system? Any suggestions would be wonderful.

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  82. Amanda
    we get asked this often and there is no way we know of to do your patterns in verse. However think how lucky you are to have them at the 2nd step, we have a post on storage. Ann and I sometimes just draw up patterns in case we might need them in a hurry.
    Enjoy

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